-30-

Election highlights

In IDS on November 3, 2010 at 11:34 am

Congratulations to everyone who helped produce IDS election content. There was some really great stuff in the paper. Here are some of the highlights.

A bold front page with lots of useful infographics.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A variety of stories including:

  • A profile of an IU grad student working at a polling site
  • Coverage of the Monroe County Community School Corporation tax referendum
  • An article about the youth vote
  • FOUR candidate reaction articles

One of my favorite stories about the election was written by Amanda Jacobson. It was about Greg Knott, a Libertarian running for U.S. Congress. Here’s how it starts:

After almost getting arrested at a local nursing home during his campaign for U.S. Congress and encountering a crazed anarchist named “Monkey” outside the 9th District congressional debate in Bloomington, Libertarian Greg Knott seemed to take this year’s campaign with a grain of salt.

Sitting underneath the television at Kilroy’s Bar and Grill sipping on a Newcastle Brown Ale, Knott high-fived his two-person campaign staff as results rolled across the screen.

“The nursing home must have misunderstood the meaning of soliciting, which means asking somebody for something. We were just handing out information,” Knott said. “We left before the cops came, so that’s good.”

Yesterday I read that Knott would be watching returns at Kilroy’s, and I was praying a reporter would be sitting at $2 Tuesdays with him. There are some nice details in this story. Here are some of my favorites.

  • Knott was “sipping on a Newcastle Brown Ale.” Get the name of the dog. If there isn’t a dog, get the name of the beer.
  • Observation and dialogue lead to gems like:

    “Five percent! Yeah!” Knott cheered, smiling and laughing with his colleagues.

    In between cracking jokes and toasting Knott’s small percentage, Hilton remarked on his perspective of the opposing candidates

    “Todd Young is a decent fella, but he doesn’t hold a candle to the greatness that is Greg ‘NO BULL’ Knott,” Hilton said.

  • The writer included information about Knott’s campaign throughout the article. This is, after all, an election night story.
  • The writer realized that this story had to be funny. The candidate was watching election returns in a college bar. Can you imagine trying to make this story a serious candidate reaction piece? I can’t.

I have one other question I want to throw out. It’s about the lede on the Todd Young story. Almost 99 percent of the time, I hate using exclamation points. However, would adding one improve this lede? Would it have changed the tone of the story?

Actual lede:

“We won.”

Cheers erupted as Republican 9th District Congressman-elect Todd Young said these simple words to his supporters who had gathered Tuesday to watch the election unfold.

Or…

“We won!”

Cheers erupted as Republican 9th District Congressman-elect Todd Young said these simple words to his supporters who had gathered Tuesday to watch the election unfold.

This quote was really great, too. It could have been the lede:

“I had two speeches drafted tonight. One I call my frowny speech. The other is my smiley speech. Ladies and gentleman, I’m pleased to report to you tonight that we get Congress back.”

What do you think? Did you like the election coverage?

Advertisements
  1. I also really enjoyed the election coverage. P1 looks great, as well as the other inside pages. This is definitely a keeper.

    As for Michael Auslen’s story about Todd Young’s win, I think that an exclamation point may have made this lede stronger, but less accurate. (Bear with the shameless self-promotion here, but…) if you check out the online video, you’ll see that after Young hung up the phone his declaration was simply a statement. He said “We won.” not “We won!” It was a re-assuring statement to his supporters who already knew the good news.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: